Tag Archive for The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook

Open Data Institute: FOI Talk

FOIMan gave last Friday’s ODI Friday lecture at the Open Data Institute in London.

Paul Gibbons speaking at the ODI

Paul Gibbons speaking at the Open Data Institute © Open Data Institute 2019

I gave a talk on Friday 27th September as part of the Open Data Institute’s programme of ODI Friday lectures. Slightly early for International Right to Know Day (which it was on Saturday), I spoke about the importance of FOI Officers to successful implementation and improvement of FOI and transparency initiatives. You can watch my presentation on YouTube on the Open Data Institute’s channel.

I refer in the talk to my book. If you want to know more about The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook, I have set up a new page where you can access details of the book including a free chapter (and a discount on the cover price of the book), the video above and more.

There are also lots of other free resources under the Resources tab above.

Free Chapter of The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook

FOIMan brings you a free chapter from his recently published book The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook.

Copies of The Freedom of Information Officer's HandbookI was thrilled last week to read a really positive review of my new book by Lynn Wyeth, Head of Information Governance at Leicester City Council (and well-known commenter on FOI and information rights matters) in the Freedom of Information Journal. She had lots of good things to say including:

What makes this book different to other books written about FOI is that it’s written by a practitioner for practitioners…

Describing it as a ‘desperately needed practitioners’ FOI bible’, Lynn finishes by saying:

Every FOI Officer should have a copy on their desk.

There are more reviews available on the Facet Publishing website if you are interested. I hope you’ll understand me drawing attention to these reviews: writing a book is a huge undertaking and a) given the work involved, it is heartwarming and (honestly) a relief to see such a positive reception, and b) I’d like as many people as possible to read it!

As an academic publisher, I understand that some will find Facet’s standard pricing of their output a little on the high side. I’ve been very conscious of this since first discussing the idea with them back in 2017. With this in mind, just a few things that I’m doing to try to ensure anyone who is interested can access at least some of its content:

Whether you’re studying for a qualification, need help with answering requests, or are just interested in FOI and access to information, I hope you’ll enjoy reading the free chapter provided here and perhaps the book itself.

The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook is here

Copies of FOI Officer's HandbookFOIMan announces the publication of his new book designed to assist FOI Officers and anyone else to better understand FOI.

I’m proud to announce the publication of my new book, The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook. Formally released by Facet Publishing on 3 January 2019, it is now available to purchase from online retailers, or from the publisher direct (see the end of this post for details of how to obtain a discount on the cover price as a reader of this blog).

Elizabeth Barber, chair of the Public Sector Group of the Information and Records Management Society, describes the Handbook as:

a practical guide which takes the reader on a journey through the intricacies of dealing with FOI…It contains everything you ever wanted to know about FOI and in a really easy to read format.

Whilst Jonathan Baines, well-known commentator on information rights and Data Protection Adviser at Mishcon de Reya, welcomed:

the first book which really meets the needs of and challenges facing FOI practitioners.

The book is intended as a practical guide to FOI for those who administer freedom of information and transparency requirements. However, anyone with an interest in FOI – as a requester, from an academic perspective, or otherwise – will, I hope, find the Handbook a valuable tool in better understanding FOI’s requirements and its practical implementation. The book is focussed on the UK experience of FOI, but contains extensive coverage of similar laws elsewhere and highlights the key differences between different FOI laws. As Elizabeth Barber comments, “[t]he book can be used either as a cover-to-cover read for those who are new to FoI or as a dip-in reference resource for those who are more experienced.”

The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook is divided into three sections:

  • Understanding the Act – looking at the history of FOI, its geographical spread, how to interpret the UK’s FOI Act including a whole chapter dedicated to the exemptions, and a guide to other sources of help
  • FOI in Context – with chapters on the Environmental Information Regulations, data protection and GDPR, records management and public records laws, transparency requirements (including open data) and copyright
  • FOI in Practice – exploring the role of the FOI Officer, what infrastructure is needed to support compliance, the stages of handling a request, how to communicate effectively with applicants and a guide to conducting internal reviews and the role of the Information Commissioner.

One copy of the FOI Officer's HandbookFor me, the release of the Handbook on 3 January 2019 marked the culmination of almost two years of hard work, and I’m extremely proud of the finished product. I hope readers will indulge me talking about it over the next few months – as anyone who has written a book will testify, it involves a huge commitment of time and effort. As an author, I’d obviously like as many people as possible to read what I’ve created.

In addition though, I wrote this book because I felt that there wasn’t enough support (or credit) given to FOI practitioners. So I hope that at least a few FOI Officers will gain some confidence from the content of the Handbook. And if anyone else reads it, that they will have more respect for, and understanding of, the people who do their best to make FOI work in practice.

More details about The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook, including a full list of the contents, can be found on the Facet Publishing website. You can also read Elizabeth Barber’s and Jonathan Baines’s opinions of the book in full there.


If you would like to obtain a copy of The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook, you can get a 30% discount on the RRP of £64.95 (purchasing it for £45.45) by emailing info(Replace this parenthesis with the @ sign)facetpublishing.co.uk, quoting the code FOIBLOG30. Do not supply payment card or bank account details by email. The publisher’s distributor will then contact you to arrange payment and discuss where to send your copy.

The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook

FOIMan unveils a forthcoming book seeking to define the role of the FOI Officer and provide help to anyone struggling with the management of their organisation’s FOI obligations.

The Freedom of Information Officer's Handbook, Facet PublishingIf you are employed as a FOI Officer, or even just do a job that involves dealing with a lot of FOI requests, one of the problems has always been that there is no manual. Until now. Later this year, Facet Publishing will be bringing you The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook, a new book about FOI by…well, me.

Yes, I referred recently to my relative silence online in recent months, explaining that this was partly down to the demand for GDPR training over the last few months (which continues), but also hinted at another mystery time-consuming commitment. I can now reveal that the latter has been (and continues to be), the writing of this book. This will be my first book (and perhaps my last!), which is obviously exciting for me, but hopefully also an interesting development for those of you who have followed this blog over the last few years.

There are plenty of places to find guidance on FOI, and even other books that explore FOI from a legal perspective, focussing on the application of exemptions for example. However, there isn’t anything (to my knowledge at least) that provides a comprehensive guide to how FOI should be managed by public authorities. So whilst you will find useful summaries of the law and how exemptions should be applied in this book, you will also find guidance on best practice when it comes to administering FOI. A chapter on embedding FOI in your organisation will include the development of policies and procedures, and how to assess and address training needs. Another on managing FOI will look at the IT systems that can be used to log requests, and how to improve performance, amongst other things. Some of you will have been lucky enough to receive FOI requests from me over the last year,* and the answers to those requests, together with my own experiences over the last 15 years, and other published research on FOI, will bring a fresh perspective on how FOI should be managed.

A really important thing for me in proposing and writing this book has been to explore the role of the FOI Officer. FOI is still relatively new, and whilst I often refer to FOI Officers in this blog and elsewhere, there aren’t actually that many people who answer requests that are called ‘FOI Officer’ within their own organisation. They often have to fit FOI work around other responsibilities. The work of those involved in FOI management, and the challenge they face, is often hugely underestimated by both requesters and by their colleagues and managers. In this book I hope to cast some light on their work and help those in these roles to be better appreciated by both others and (perhaps more importantly) by themselves.

The book won’t ignore related legislation either. The Environmental Information Regulations will feature heavily, and a chapter on copyright and re-use will discuss the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations and how they interact with FOI. There will also be brief descriptions of how the various FOI laws from around the British Islands (Scotland, Ireland, Isle of Man, States of Jersey) differ from the UK one that is the focus of the book.

Finally, the book offers the opportunity to provide an updated vision of FOI management in the context of the latest developments. In particular, I’ll be looking at what GDPR means for FOI, both in terms of compliance, but also considering what lessons there might be from concepts such as Data Protection Officers and data protection by design. The new s.45 Code of Practice will obviously feature (and I’m hoping the finalised version will be published in time to be referenced!).

The book is obviously aimed primarily at practitioners and others working in public authorities. However, just as this blog has proved to be of interest to a wider audience of journalists, academics, and other users of the Act over the last few years, hopefully the book will also appeal to those outside the public sector curious about how FOI works in practice.

The Freedom of Information Officer’s Handbook will be published by Facet Publishing towards the end of this year. It retails at £59.95, but readers of this blog can pre-order copies direct from the publisher with a 30% discount (resulting in a reduced price of £41.99). To take advantage of the discount, email info(Replace this parenthesis with the @ sign)facetpublishing.co.uk to indicate your interest in ordering a copy and quote the code FOIMAN (do not supply payment card or bank account details by email). The publisher’s distributor will then contact you to arrange payment and discuss despatch instructions. For more details about how your information will be used by Facet, see the privacy policy on their website.

* And more seriously, a very big thank you to everyone who has answered FOI requests from me or helped in any way over the last few months – it is hugely appreciated.